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Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Notices of new content, points of interest, use and reuse of our collection of digitized newspapers.
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The webinar recording for "Using Chronicling America for Historical Research: The Atlanta Campaign of the American Civil War" is now available.Join the Library of Congress in exploring historical events, such as those in the American Civil War, using Chronicling America, a free digital collection of over 20 million pages from American newspapers published between 1770 and 1963. The talk demonstrates search strategies for names, places, and events in this vast collection. The methods can also be used to research general military history and other events.Click here for more information.A contemporary newspaper map of the city of Atlanta in 1864 showing the location of some fortificationsÂ
Join Library of Congress Reference Librarian Amber Paranick and Digital Conversion Specialist Mike Saelee to learn how to search for primary source materials in Chronicling America, a free digital collection of over 20 million pages from American newspapers published between 1770 and 1963 for National History Day research. The presentation will cater to this year’s theme, "Turning Points in History," and will discuss the collection, its search interface, how to navigate the challenges of working with historic newspapers, and additional resources to assist students and educators. Chronicling America is jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress.This presentation will be hosted live on September 6, 2023 from 1:00-1:35pm EDT and will be recorded for later viewing. For those unable to attend this program at the time, the recording will be available for viewing afterward at the Newspaper and Current Periodical Reading Room's Event Webinars collection.Individuals requiring ADA accommodations should submit a request at least five business days in advance by contacting (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov.Please register for the event.
Photograph of author Kerri Arsenault a white woman with brown hair wearing a black shirt beside text advertising the webinar.The National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress and invites you to attend the webinar on September 20, 2023 at 4:00PM ET "Can Historical Newspapers be an Antidote to the Environmental Crisis?" in which author Kerri Arsenault considers how our environmental crisis is tethered to an aesthetic and rhetorical crisis. So many institutions grant the public “free” access to archives, but what if—as an ordinary citizen—you can’t even find the door? This talk will consider barriers to information, how such obstacles may exacerbate the environmental crisis, and what newspapers can do that many resources cannot to help unlock knowledge for those who need it most.Kerri Arsenault is a literary critic, co-director of The Environmental Storytelling Studio at Brown University, contributing editor at Orion magazine, and author of Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains (2020), which won the Rachel Carson Environmental Book Award (2021) and the Maine Literary Award for Nonfiction (2021) and was a finalist for the Connecticut Humanities Book Award for Nonfiction (2021). Recently, she was a Democracy Fellow at Harvard’s Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History and a fellow at the Science History Institute. Her writing has been published in the Boston Globe, the Paris Review, the New York Review of Books, the Washington Post, and the New York Times.Click to register for the event.
In case you missed it, the video recording from the September 6 webinar "Chronicling America 'Turning Points in History'" is available.Join Library of Congress Reference Librarian Amber Paranick and Digital Conversion Specialist Mike Saelee to learn how to search for primary source materials in Chronicling America, a free digital collection of over 20 million pages from American newspapers published between 1770 and 1963 for National History Day research. The presentation caters to this year’s theme, "Turning Points in History," and will discuss the collection, its search interface, how to navigate the challenges of working with historic newspapers, and additional resources to assist students and educators. Chronicling America is jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress.Newspaper article with the headline Harry S. Truman Selects Six Great Turning Points in American History
The 2024 Junior Fellows Program (JFP) is accepting applications now through Monday, November 27, 2023. JFP 2024 is a paid internship offering remote and onsite projects for many different majors and interests.OpportunityThe Junior Fellows Program is a paid, full-time summer internship that enables the next generation of diverse cultural institution professionals to experience and interpret the collections, events, and services of the world's largest, all-inclusive library. Projects increase access to Library of Congress collections and promote awareness of the Library's resources to Congress and people in communities across America. With guidance from mentors, Junior Fellows produce products that position the Library as a dynamic center for fostering innovation, sparking creativity, and building lifelong connections. Program Dates and ScheduleJFP24 starts on Monday, May 20 and ends on Friday, July 26, 2024. Junior Fellows work 40 hours per week, Monday – Friday.EligibilityCurrently enrolled undergraduate and graduate students from all majors, and recent graduates between January 1, 2023 – December 31, 2023 are eligible to apply. How to Apply Download the JFP How to Apply This brochure provides step-by-step advice for preparing and submitting an application. Read the full description of JFP 2024 on the Library’s Internships and Fellowships Opportunities Review remote and/or onsite project offerings and follow the links to USAJOBS to apply.Connect with JFP Visit the JFP Overview page on loc.gov for intern portfolio content, including capstone Display Day videos. Subscribe to the Of the People blog, an active platform for intern spotlights, program resources, and new ways to use Library collections.Researching the Black Press in Chronicling America (Remote)Project Description: In this project, the Junior Fellow will learn how to research the Black Press in America in the 19th and early 20th centuries using primary and secondary sources and write newspaper history essays to provide context to users of Chronicling America under the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP). This project seeks to expand collection access and context for many of the individual newspaper titles digitized in a 2021-2023 project. The incumbent will create up to ten well-researched newspaper history essays up to 500 words long, representing significant titles or groups of titles from this collection, providing additional context to the content in the newspapers, the community they served, and the publishers and editors who created the newspapers. Americans will benefit from this project by gaining a deeper of the Black Press and its impact.Knowledge and skills required: Ability to perform research in historic primary resources. Ability to research and write concise, well-written essays for public consumption. Knowledge of 19th and early 20th century African American History, including people, events, and places. Familiarity in using digital collections repositories or databases, or digitized materials.Knowledge and skills preferred: Ability to perform research in historic newspapers. Familiarity with the American Black Press in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
The Library of Congress is excited to announce that the Chronicling America Historic Newspapers website is in the process of transitioning from the legacy Chronicling America interface to a new Chronicling America interface and back-end search infrastructure. In Spring 2024, visitors going to chroniclingamerica.loc.gov will be re-directed to the new Chronicling America website, which will continue to provide free access to historic digitized newspapers. The exact date will be announced in the coming months on the new Chronicling America Website Migration page, on the Chronicling America Historical Newspapers email list, and also added to the home pages on both versions of the Chronicling America website. The current version of the website will be officially sunset later in 2024.Users are encouraged to begin using the new Chronicling America website for research. A Research Guide on using Chronicling America in the new environment is available. In the new system, the digitized newspapers will become part of a larger Library of Congress digital collections framework that recently received major upgrades to accommodate future growth and expansion of the collection. New website features include faceted browse options (refine searches by ethnicity, location, subject, language, etc.), improved image viewing, improved Advanced Search options, and more. The new interface also allows users to browse digitized titles in a map. Uploads to the new interface are now automated so you may notice that there are more pages available in the new interface than the longstanding version of Chronicling America. As part of the updates, the United States Newspaper Directory 1690-Present has also been migrated into a separate searchable collection. Users can access the new Directory of U.S. Newspapers in American Libraries, which is a searchable index of newspapers published in the United States since 1690. This directory can help identify what titles exist for a specific place and time, and how to access them. For a detailed overview of the Directory, search tips, and FAQs, please consult the Directory of U.S. Newspapers in American Libraries: A Guide for Researchers.  Digital Humanities scholars and researchers who access the collection via computational methods will continue to have access to bulk OCR but should transition to using the Loc.Gov API at loc.gov/apis. Bulk OCR downloads can be accessed from the longstanding OCR Data page until further notice when a new "Datasets" page will be made available on the new site.Chronicling America was originally launched in 2007 and later updated to the current version of the website in 2011. Since that time, the site saw the growth of the collection to include over 21 million newspaper pages from every state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP). Co-sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), NDNP continues to award funds to cultural heritage institutions around the United States to participate in the program.Please send feedback about the new website to ndnptech@loc.gov and subscribe to the Chronicling America Historical Newspapers email list for more updates.
As we announced last week, Chronicling America is in the process of transitioning from the legacy Chronicling America interface to a new Chronicling America interface and back-end search infrastructure. Read more about it.Through its enhanced search interface, the new Chronicling America offers more options to search the collection than the old Chronicling America.In the old Chronicling America interface, the simple search is on the home page. On the new Chronicling America interface, the simple search is available at the top of every page within this digital collection. Note "This Collection" is automatically populated in the top search bar on the "About this Collection" page. To access the Advanced Search, on the old interface, click on the "Advanced Search" tab. In this tab, you can refine your search by state, title, years or date range, language, and by doing multiple types of keyword searches. To access the new Advanced Search, click on the "Collection Items" tab and click the "plus" button next to "Advanced Search." After the Advanced Search is expanded, you can search by title, issue, or page. Select "Pages" to search within the full text of the collection's newspapers and to filter by language. You can still do multiple types of keyword searches and narrow your search by State/Province, County, City, and Title. For example, if you want to search only Arkansas titles, select "Arkansas" from the "State/Province" drop-down menu and only Arkansas titles will appear in the "Title" field. You can also narrow the new advanced search by ethnicity, such as African American, German, or Polish, and narrow your search by date. Once you hit "Search," you can further narrow your results using the facets on the left sidebar, for example, by title, date, county, or ethnicity. This is a new feature that the old interface was not able to do. Try out a search in the new Chronicling America interface today! The Chronicling America historic newspapers online collection is a product of the National Digital Newspapers Program and jointly sponsored by the Library and the National Endowment for the Humanities.